Friday, 16 February 2018

Marketing A Book - Ten Ways to Learn How

At Triskele Books, we've spent a lot of time and money on learning how to market our books. And as a collective, we share everything we learn with each other. So today, we're sharing with you. Here are ten of the books, sites, resources and courses that we've found most useful.
Books 

Your First 1000 Copies by Tim Grahl
A great place to start, especially if the word marketing brings you out in a rash. Solid, helpful advice and a wise approach to the author-marketing mindset.

Let's Get Visible by David Gaughran
The partner volume to Let's Get Digital (also recommended), Gaughran understands the workings of the Kindle store better than most and offers practical, clear advice on how to use it.

Write. Publish. Repeat by Sean Platt and Johnny B. Truant
This is a broader look at building a career from your writing, with a focus on craft as well as marketing.

How To Market a Book by Joanna Penn
Distilling her own experience and advice into one book, which is easy to read and useful for authors at every stage of the publishing process, Joanna is an inspiration.

How To Get Your Self Published Book Into Bookstores by Debbie Young
IN her typically approachable and friendly style, ALLi Publications Manager Debbie Young covers all the angles and some you hadn't even considered.

Websites

Mark Dawson's Self Publishing Formula
Mark and his team offer lots of free advice via podcasts and resource books, plus some powerful paid courses that have transformed many writers' careers.

Dave Chesson's Free AMS Ads Course
Very useful 5-day course aimed at digging into the nuts and bolts of Amazon Marketing Services.

Your First 10K Readers by Nick Stephenson
All kinds of helpful advice with a particular focus on growing a mailing list, Nick's blog and videos are an essential part of any author's marketing toolbox.

Anne R Allen's blog with Ruth Harris.
The pair are focused largely on craft, but have some excellent and easily digestible tips on marketing and self promotion.

Jane Friedman is always at the cutting edge of changes in the publishing world and offers weekly updates and insights into what's afoot. A must read.

Friday, 9 February 2018

What Are You Reading (2) ... and is it romantic?

By Gillian Hamer

So, February is the month of love. Ho-hum. Or so we are told. But in the spirit of all things romantic, in the second of our What Are You Reading articles we touch on love stories in all their guises.

In the hope of discovering a few more masterpieces, or at least adding to our ‘to be read’ pile, Triskele members share our current reads with you - and ask for your latest hot reads in exchange. Please join in the discussion and let's spread the word about some of the great books out there - whether classics or latest finds.

FEBRUARY - What are you reading?


LIZA PERRAT

The Lost Son of Philomena Lee by Martin Sixsmith

Not a romance in the true sense of the word, but plenty of love features in this true and tragic story of an unmarried mother whose son was forcibly adopted (stolen and sold) from Ireland in the mid-1950s.
The story follows firstly her atrocious experience with the nuns in the Irish convent, then the son's life adopted life in the USA, where he becomes a high-level Republican worker for Pres Reagan. His search for his mother and her search for him expose the crimes of the Catholic Church concerning forced adoptions. This books certainly pulled on my heartstrings far more than a classic tale of romance.



JANE DIXON SMITH

The Virgin's Lover by Philippa Gregory.

The title says it all and the cover is very pink ... It follows Elizabeth I as she finally ascends the English throne, with many pushing for her marriage to secure the future of England. Her eye is on Robert Dudley, but as always, everyone at court is jostling for power and there are enemies in every corner.





GILLIAN HAMER

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Again, not a traditional romance, but there is love in there, mostly of the 'unrequited', 'unexpected' and 'search for unconditional' varieties. This is a cleverly written novel from the perspective of a character who sees the world through very different eyes than most, and survives each day the only way she knows how ... because no one has ever shown Eleanor Oliphant how to live rather than simply survive. When the layers of her life are slowly revealed, the reader is dragged through every emotion possible.
Romance? Possibly not. But Valentines is probably a good time to read it to help you appreciate the good things in life.




 
J.J. MARSH

Mythos by Stephen Fry.

Mythos is a retelling of some Greek myths by Stephen Fry and it is most definitely romantic.
Fry’s urbane tones shine through as he tells legendary tales of passion and drama, and reveals all kinds of quite interesting facts in his footnotes.
Entertaining, educational and filled with genuine love for a good story.



CATRIONA TROTH

Sofia Khan Is Not Obliged by Ayisha Malik

Sofia Khan is a totally recognisable, flawed, modern young woman. She wears skinny jeans, smokes, swears, has issues with deadlines and agonises about getting fat while scoffing muffins and lemon puffs. So far, so Bridget Jones. On the other hand, she wears a hijab, doesn’t drink alcohol, prays five times a day and has no intention of having sex before marriage. And Sofia and her friends have to deal with things Bridget could never have imagined - from Muslim speed dating, to deciding whether it’s okay to become a polygamous second wife. As for emotional blackmail, Muslim aunties take it to new heights.

But Sofia Khan has something BJD never quite achieved – a sense of real heart. Do not expect this to end with Sofia ripping off her hijab and going on a binge. Nor with her settling down to be a ‘traditional’ submissive wife. This is about how you can be modern, independent, strong-minded – and still a faithful Muslim. Something most Muslim women have always known; Malik is just letting the rest of us in on the secret.